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Mad Dogs and Englishness

Mad Dogs and Englishness: Popular Music and English Identities

by Lee Brooks

Lee Brooks works in the School of Arts and Humanities at St Mary’s University, Twickenham, UK. He has experience of teaching courses on popular music cultures. He has also published on subjects such as Sixties Britain, The Beatles and Morrissey. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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, Mark Donnelly

Mark Donnelly work in the School of Arts and Humanities at St Mary’s University, Twickenham, UK. They have extensive experience of teaching courses on popular music cultures. They have also published on subjects such as Sixties Britain, The Beatles and Morrissey. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and Richard Mills

Richard Mills work in the School of Arts and Humanities at St Mary’s University, Twickenham, UK. They have extensive experience of teaching courses on popular music cultures. They have also published on subjects such as Sixties Britain, The Beatles and Morrissey. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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(eds)
Bloomsbury Academic, 2017
  • DOI:
    10.5040/9781501311284
  • ISBN:
    978-1-5013-1125-3 (hardback)

    978-1-5013-1126-0 (epdf)

    978-1-5013-1127-7 (epub)

    978-1-5013-1128-4 (online)
  • Edition:
    First edition
  • Place of Publication:
    New York
  • Published Online:
    2018
Mad Dogs and Englishness
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Mad Dogs and Englishness connects English popular music with questions about English national identities, featuring essays that range across Bowie and Burial, PJ Harvey, Bishi and Tricky. The later years of the 20th century saw a resurgence of interest in cultural and political meanings of Englishness in ways that continue to resonate now. Pop music is simultaneously on the outside and inside of the ensuing debates. It can be used as a mode of commentary about how meanings of Englishness circulate socially. But it also produces those meanings, often underwriting claims about English national cultural distinctiveness and superiority. This book’s expert contributors use trans-national and trans-disciplinary perspectives to provide historical and contemporary commentaries about pop’s complex relationships with Englishness. Each chapter is based on original research, and the essays comprise the best single volume available on pop and the English imaginary.