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The Organic Globalizer

The Organic Globalizer: Hip hop, political development, and movement culture

by Christopher Malone

Christopher Malone is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at Pace University, USA. He is the author of Between Freedom and Bondage (2007) and co-editor of Occupying Political Science (2013). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and George Martinez Jr.

George Martinez Jr. is Adjunct Professor of Political Science at Pace University, USA, and is founder/CEO of the Global Block Foundation. He serves as Cultural Envoy and Hip-Hop Ambassador for the U.S. Department of State. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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(eds)
Bloomsbury Academic, 2015
  • DOI:
    10.5040/9781501302299
  • ISBN:
    978-1-5013-0229-9 (online)

    978-1-6289-2005-5 (hardback)

    978-1-6289-2003-1 (paperback)

    978-1-6289-2008-6 (epub)

    978-1-6289-2006-2 (epdf)
  • Edition:
    First Edition
  • Place of Publication:
    London
  • Published Online:
    2018
The Organic Globalizer
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The Organic Globalizer is a collection of critical essays which takes the position that hip-hop holds political significance through an understanding of its ability to at once raise cultural awareness, expand civil society’s focus on social and economic justice through institution building, and engage in political activism and participation. Collectively, the essays assert hip hop’s importance as an “organic globalizer:” no matter its pervasiveness or reach around the world, hip-hop ultimately remains a grassroots phenomenon that is born of the community from which it permeates. Hip hop, then, holds promise through three separate but related avenues: (1) through cultural awareness and identification/recognition of voices of marginalized communities through music and art; (2) through social creation and the institutionalization of independent alternative institutions and non-profit organizations in civil society geared toward social and economic justice; and (3) through political activism and participation in which demands are articulated and made on the state.