Loading

Results

  • Instruments Close
Sort By:  1-10 of 578 (58 pages)
Results per page:
         

Tea-Chest Bass (‘Bush Bass’)

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...The tea-chest bass is a rhythm instrument made from a thin plywood tea chest measuring approximately 27 cubic inches (70 cm3). In the center of the base of the chest, a strong cord, fine rope or hay-band is knotted through a hole and strung...

Slapping (Bass)

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...Slapping (Bass)Slapping is a percussive style of pizzicato jazz bass-playing originally employed on the double bass, but also applicable to the electric bass guitar. The sound is made by the impact of the string on the instrument...

Mbira (Thumb Piano)

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...The mbira or thumb piano is a percussion instrument of African origin. It consists of a wooden board or box with strips of metal or wood attached in such a way that the player’s thumbs or fingers can pluck the metal strips to produce...

Appalachian Dulcimer

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...The Appalachian dulcimer, sometimes also called the ‘mountain’ or ‘plucked’ dulcimer, is a type of ‘box-zither’ found in the upland south of the United States, hence the term ‘Appalachian’ dulcimer. It evolved from the German scheitholt...

Mechanical Banjo

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...BanjoThe mechanical banjo, one of the more unusual mechanical instruments, was introduced in the United States. The Encore Automatic Banjo was made in the mid-1890s and played from a perforated-paper roll, but its particular cleverness...

Bones

Paul Oliver

Paul Oliver is a Fellow of Oxford Brookes University. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...The bones or, as they were known in the 1840s, the ‘bone castanets’ were among the simpler ‘found’ instruments, but ones that have been associated with minstrelsy since the earliest years. An African origin has been posited for them, though...

Concert Organ

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...Although church organs had been used for playing secular music and for performing in public concerts since at least the early seventeenth century, organs were rarely found in secular locations before the eighteenth century. Indeed, secular...

Conga Drums

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...The hand drums commonly referred to as ‘conga drums’ or, simply, ‘congas’ made their way into popular music by way of a long history that began with the folkloric and ritual musics of the peoples of Africa. Beginning in the fifteenth...

Drums

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...Construction Drums, perhaps the most ubiquitous of instruments, are percussion instruments with a vibrating membrane that is sounded by striking or rubbing. Most drums consist of a rounded or oblong hollow body...

Slit-Drum

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...The slit-drum, also known as a wooden gong and a log drum, belongs to the category of musical instruments in which sound is produced by the vibration of solid material. As such, it is organologically classified as an idiophone. Sachs (1940)...