Loading

Results

  • Harmony Close
Sort By:  1-10 of 53 (6 pages)
Results per page:
         

Voice Leading

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...‘Voice leading’ refers to the linear movement, stasis or dissolution of tones during the progression from one chord to another. Tones can move in contrary motion (voices moving away from each other), oblique motion (one or more voices...

Turnaround

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...The original meaning of ‘turnaround’ denotes a short progression of chords played at the end of one section of a song or instrumental number, the purpose of which is to facilitate recapitulation of the complete harmonic sequence...

Polyphony

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...‘Polyphony’ from the Greek poly (meaning ‘many’) and fone (meaning ‘sound’), denotes: (a) music in which at least two sounds of clearly differing pitch, timbre or mode of articulation occur at the same time (general definition); (b) music...

Antiphony

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...‘Antiphony’ from the Greek antifonía, meaning ‘opposing sound’ is an umbrella term denoting performance techniques in which one line of music is alternated with another contrasting or complementary musical line of roughly equal importance...

Modality

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...‘Modality’ from Latin modus (meaning ‘measure,’ ‘manner,’ ‘ mode’), is a term used mainly to denote certain types of tonal vocabulary that diverge from that predominant within Central European art music (ca. 1730-1910) and tonally...

Modulation

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...The term ‘modulation’ refers to a change from one key to another within a song, improvisation or composition. Conventionally, the term refers to a change of tonic pitch, but not to a change of mode with the same tonic pitch. Thus, a piece...

Pentatonicism

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...Pentatonicism is a type of modality based on five identifiable pitches within an octave. Pentatonic modes are widespread throughout the world. Particularly common in English-language popular music of the postwar period are the two...

Drone

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...The term ‘drone’ (Fr. bourdon; Ger. Bordun; It. bordone) describes one or more sustained notes of identical pitch that, usually, accompany a melodic line often performed in a higher register. The note(s) can be sounded continuously (a...

Heterophony

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...psalms‘Heterophony,’ from the Greek héteros (‘other’) and fóne (’sound’), means the polyphony resulting from the differences of pitch that are produced when two or more people sing or play the same melodic line at the same time. ‘...

Homophony

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World Volume II : Performance and Production

Continuum, 2003

Encyclopedia Articles

...‘Homophony’ (adj. homophonic), from the Greek homofonos (meaning ‘sounding in unison or at the same time’), is denned as a type of polyphony in which the various instruments and/or voices move in the same rhythm at the same time; in other...