Bloomsbury Popular Music
Loading
Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World
Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World

John Shepherd

John Shepherd is Vice-Provost and Associate Vice-President (Academic) and Chancellor’s Professor of Music and Sociology at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. He was from 2007-2012 Carleton’s Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs. Dr. Shepherd has been a member of EPMOW’s editorial board since 1990. In 2000, he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in recognition of his role “as a leading architect of a post-War critical musicology.” Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications
, David Horn

David Horn was a founding editor of the journal Popular Music and a founding member of IASPM (The International Association for the Study of Popular Music). He was Director of the Institute of Popular Music at the University of Liverpool from 1988 until his retirement in 2002. Together with the blues scholar Paul Oliver he first proposed the idea of EPMOW in the 1980s, and has worked on the project since that time. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications
, Dave Laing

Dave Laing is the author of several books on popular music and a former editor of Music Week. Former Research Fellow at the University of Westminster where he conducted research on the music industry. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications
, Paul Oliver

Paul Oliver is a Fellow of Oxford Brookes University. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications
and Peter Wicke

Center for Popular Music Research, The Humboldt Univeristy, Berlin Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications
(eds)

Continuum, 2003

Related Content

The Rock Journalist

Page Range: 255

Linked to this stylistic evolution was the development of the cult of the rock journalist, in which the figure of the writer took on the romantic attributes of the rock star. Journalists of the 1970s, such as Nick Kent (United Kingdom) and Lester Bangs (United States), carefully cultivated public images of themselves. For instance, at the start of his retrospective review of Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks, Bangs places the record in relation to his own experiences and to popular cultural myths relating to late-1960s burnout: ‘It was particularly important to me because the fall of 1968 was such a terrible time: I was a physical and mental wreck, nerves shredded and ghosts and spiders looming and squatting across the mind’ (1991, 20). Kent’s writing is peppered with references to his own drug-taking, hedonism and personal relationships with such infamous rock stars as Sid Vicious and Keith Richards. Hill (1991) describes music journalists of this time as a ‘fraternity [which] unerringly reflected the culture it documented’ (173). The figure of the journalist can thus be linked to the specifically male image of the romantic bohemian figure entrenched within rock mythology.

McDonnell’s and Powers’s (1995) collection of rock writing by women celebrates the proliferation of women in this field, reflecting that they are rarely celebrated as great or ‘legendary’ writers or included in the canon of rock criticism. Sullivan’s (1995) account of the day-today demands of her career further suggests that the romantic image of the journalist is a construction that is directly at odds with the realities of the profession. She outlines the drawbacks of the job: its low pay and unsociable hours; the necessity of traveling alone to get to gigs; and the severe limitations imposed by deadlines on the amount of research a journalist can do on a particular artist.