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Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World
Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World

John Shepherd

John Shepherd is Vice-Provost and Associate Vice-President (Academic) and Chancellor’s Professor of Music and Sociology at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. He was from 2007-2012 Carleton’s Dean of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs. Dr. Shepherd has been a member of EPMOW’s editorial board since 1990. In 2000, he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in recognition of his role “as a leading architect of a post-War critical musicology.” Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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, David Horn

David Horn was a founding editor of the journal Popular Music and a founding member of IASPM (The International Association for the Study of Popular Music). He was Director of the Institute of Popular Music at the University of Liverpool from 1988 until his retirement in 2002. Together with the blues scholar Paul Oliver he first proposed the idea of EPMOW in the 1980s, and has worked on the project since that time. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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, Dave Laing

Dave Laing is the author of several books on popular music and a former editor of Music Week. Former Research Fellow at the University of Westminster where he conducted research on the music industry. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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, Paul Oliver

Paul Oliver is a Fellow of Oxford Brookes University. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and Peter Wicke

Center for Popular Music Research, The Humboldt Univeristy, Berlin Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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(eds)

Continuum, 2003

Related Content

The New Journalism

Page Range: 254

From the mid-1960s onward, music journalism increasingly revealed the profound influence of the emerging New Journalism movement. Spearheaded by color-supplement and magazine writers such as Tom Wolfe and Hunter S. Thompson and novelists such as Norman Mailer and Truman Capote, the New Journalism undertook to take journalism out of the realm of mere ‘dry’ reporting of facts by utilizing many of the stylistic components of fiction. Its conventions had an important influence on style and content, as well as on the construction of the image of the journalist within music (especially rock) journalism. Stylistic traits pioneered by the new journalists, such as scene-by-scene construction, third-person point of view, recording of everyday detail and the inclusion of the persona of the journalist within the text, were appropriated by US and UK music critics from the end of the 1960s. The fact that many new journalists explicitly created a new cultural agenda that treated popular culture as worthy of serious analysis has also been attributed to the influence of the New Journalism. For example, Tom Wolfe, writing in 1966, makes clear that the subject matter of much of his writing constitutes a definite shift in aesthetic boundaries:

The educated classes, the people who grow up to control visual and printed communication media, are all plugged into what is … an ancient, aristocratic aesthetic. The Jerk, the Monkey and rock music still seem beneath serious consideration. Yet all these rancid people are creating new styles all the time and changing the life of the whole country in ways that nobody even seems to bother to record, much less analyse. (Wolfe 1981, 12)

Significantly, this evolution in writing style occurred at the same time as mainstream rock music began to take itself more seriously, with the incorporation of art and folk aesthetics into the genre. Subsequent journalistic criticism began to reflect and reinforce this position.